Mexico Acquires Technology To Measure The Danger Of Earthquakes And Tsunamis

Mexico Acquires Technology To Measure The Danger Of Earthquakes And Tsunamis

The objective of this tool, which should be noted that only Japan and the United States have used before is to study the activity of earthquakes and tidal waves in the so-called Guerrero breach, where the Cocos and North American tectonic plates make contact.

The instrument enables scientists to delve into the paleosisms and paleotsunamis that have occurred in Mexico before there were human records, allowing them to go back up to 3,000 years.

The National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) presented on Tuesday the Geoslicer, an instrument with state-of-the-art technology that allows determining the activity of earthquakes and tsunamis, as well as studying old natural disasters that occurred in Mexican territory.

The researcher from the Institute of Geography of the UNAM indicated that the data collected will be valuable to undertake risk prevention and mitigation actions, since there are tectonic plates moving in different areas of the republic and having a better understanding of this issue will help not only to the population but also to the people who come from abroad either to business trips, tourism or for medical matters such as dental crowns Tijuana.

With this he referred to prepare the population better to face phenomena of this type, that know what to do and where to evacuate.

He said that the tool will improve the planning of cities and avoid new construction in areas that could be affected in the future.

Geoslicer is a technology that also allows to look back in time and study past natural disasters, corroborating the historical information on earthquakes and tsunamis documented in recent centuries.

The instrument enables scientists to delve into paleosisms and paleotsunamis that have occurred in Mexico before there were human records, allowing them to go back 3,000 years.

The tool will not only know the occurrence of earthquakes with a magnitude greater than 7 on the Richter scale, but also the distances reached by the floods caused by tsunamis and, even, calculate the maximum heights of them.

The instrument was donated by Japan as part of the Alliance for Research in Science and Technology for Sustainable Development (SATREPS, for its acronym in English).

The Japanese donation is part of the project “Assessment of the danger associated with large earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mexican Pacific coast for disaster mitigation”.